Memmert Water Bath used as a Culinary Cooking Device


Sous vide cooking in Landgasthof Siebenkäs

For more than 20 years, Ulrich Riedel has been at the stove with his crew whenever Memmert has something to celebrate. And even in the kitchen, many experiments were started together. Cherry tomatoes were dried in the vacuum oven and apple wedges were kiln-dried in the heating oven. The manager of the Landgasthof Siebenkäs especially cherishes one special kitchen device: the Memmert waterbath, which former managing director Grete Memmert Riefler had given him once and which he still uses today for sous vide cooking of meat and fish.

Molecular cuisine has put the focus on the use of laboratory devices in gastronomy. From rotary evaporator to spraying device to freeze dryer, in many adventurous kitchens, scientific equipment can be found. In the eyes of chef Ulrich Riedel from Pleinfeld, molecular cuisine is a fading trend. Moreover, it conflicts with his basic culinary principle to modify the ingredients as little as possible before serving a dish. But even in classic cooking, laboratory devices and similar equipment, especially waterbaths, the so-called Bain-Marie, are used for gentle cooking or keeping food warm.

 

Regional ingredients for upscale Franconian cuisine

Not only the gentle way of preparing ingredients is important in gastronomy, but also where they originate. Whether trout, beef cattle, veel, rucola or goat cheese: In the Franconian cuisine served by the Landgasthof Siebenkäs, almost exclusively products from Bioland organic farms, Demeter farms and other regional agricultural farms are used. Therefore, the menu of the Landgasthof Siebenkäs bears a rustic hallmark with some surprises in upscale gastronomy

Sous vide cooking in the waterbath

Vacuum cooking is one of the more modern ways to prepare food. In the 70s, it found its way into the food industry and professional gastronomy. The Memmert waterbath has been a part of Ulrich Riedel's kitchen equipment for many years. It is in operating mode nearly all day long and the chef is always amazed by how long it can keep the water temperature without being heated up again. Fish and meat are put into a plastic bag, of course free of plasticisers, evacuated and then put into the waterbath for 20 to 30 minutes. The temperature varies for different dishes between 50 and 85 °C.

For every gourmet, the indulgence of sous vide cooked dishes is a taste epiphany. While being cooked, neither nutrients nor flavour or fluids are lost through the bag. Meat loses less weight, fish stays juicy and vegetables become tender and stay firm to the bite. To cut a long story short: With sous vide cooking, the ingredients keep their great flavour and also their colour and consistency. Before serving the dishes, the tender pieces of meat and fish just have to be fried for a short time, done.

AtmoSAFE would like to thank Ulrich Riedel, manager and chef at theLandgasthof Siebenkäs for his friendly support in creating this article.


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